Monday, January 19, 2009

Manic Monday - Office



Mo gave us the word OFFICE for Manic Monday. A word that is particularly appropriate for the soon-to-be Inauguration of the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama.



The swearing-in of the President of the United States occurs upon the commencement of a new term of a President of the United States. The United States Constitution mandates that the President make the following oath or affirmation before he or she can "enter on the Execution" of the office of the presidency:

I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.

Presidential Oaths of Office

The information below is courtesy of the Architect of the Capitol. It has been compiled by the Office of the Curator from contemporary accounts and other sources in the files of the Architect of the Capitol.

DATE PRESIDENT LOCATION OATH ADMINISTERED BY
April 30, 1789 George Washington Balcony of Federal Hall, New York City Robert Livingston, Chancellor of State of New York
March 4, 1793 George Washington Senate Chamber, Congress Hall, Philadelphia William Cushing, Associate Justice of Supreme Court
March 4, 1797 John Adams House of Representatives Chamber, Congress Hall, Philadelphia Oliver Ellsworth, Chief Justice
March 4, 1801 Thomas Jefferson Senate Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1805 Thomas Jefferson Senate Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1809 James Madison House Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1813 James Madison House Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1817 James Monroe In front of Old Brick Capitol (1st & A Sts., N.E.); now site of the Supreme Court Building John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 5, 1821 James Monroe House Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1825 John Q. Adams House Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1829 Andrew Jackson East Portico, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1833 Andrew Jackson House Chamber, U.S. Capitol John Marshall, Chief Justice
March 4, 1837 Martin Van Buren East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
March 4, 1841 William H. Harrison East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
April 6, 1841 John Tyler Brown's Hotel, 6th St. & Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. William Cranch, Chief Judge of U.S. Circuit Court
March 4, 1845 James K. Polk East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
March 5, 1849 Zachary Taylor East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
July 10, 1850 Millard Fillmore House Chamber, U.S. Capitol William Cranch, Chief Judge of U.S. Circuit Court
March 4, 1853 Franklin Pierce East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
March 4, 1857 James Buchanan East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
March 4, 1861 Abraham Lincoln East Portico, U.S. Capitol Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice
March 4, 1865 Abraham Lincoln East Portico, U.S. Capitol Salmon P. Chase, Chief Justice
April 15, 1865 Andrew Johnson Kirkwood Hotel, 12th St. & Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. Salmon P. Chase, Chief Justice
March 4, 1869 Ulysses S. Grant East Portico, U.S. Capitol Salmon P. Chase, Chief Justice
March 4, 1873 Ulysses S. Grant East Portico, U.S. Capitol Salmon P. Chase, Chief Justice
March 3, 1877 Rutherford B. Hayes Privately in Red Room, White House Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice
March 5, 1877 Rutherford B. Hayes Publicly on East Portico, U.S. Capitol Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice
March 4, 1881 James A. Garfield East Portico, U.S. Capitol Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice
September 20, 1881 Chester A. Arthur Privately at his residence, 123 Lexington Avenue, New York City John R. Brady, Justice of the New York State Supreme Court
September 22, 1881 Chester A. Arthur Publicly in the Office of the Vice President, U.S. Capitol Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice
March 4, 1885 Grover Cleveland East Portico, U.S. Capitol Morrison R. Waite, Chief Justice
March 4, 1889 Benjamin Harrison East Portico, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
March 4, 1893 Grover Cleveland East Portico, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
March 4, 1897 William McKinley In front of the Original Senate Wing, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
March 4, 1901 William McKinley East Portico, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
September 14, 1901 Theodore Roosevelt Ansley Wilcox residence, Buffalo, New York John R. Hazel, U.S. District Judge for Western District of New York
March 4, 1905 Theodore Roosevelt East Portico, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
March 4, 1909 William H. Taft Senate Chamber, U.S. Capitol Melville W. Fuller, Chief Justice
March 4, 1913 Woodrow Wilson East Portico, U.S. Capitol Edward D. White, Chief Justice
March 4, 1917 Woodrow Wilson Privately in President's Room, U.S. Capitol Edward D. White, Chief Justice
March 5, 1917 Woodrow Wilson Publicly on East Portico, U.S. Capitol Edward D. White, Chief Justice
March 4, 1921 Warren G. Harding East Portico, U.S. Capitol Edward D. White, Chief Justice
August 3, 1923 Calvin Coolidge His father's residence, Plymouth, Vermont John C. Coolidge, his father, a Notary Public
March 4, 1925 Calvin Coolidge East Portico, U.S. Capitol William H. Taft, Chief Justice
March 4, 1929 Herbert C. Hoover East Portico, U.S. Capitol William H. Taft, Chief Justice
March 4, 1933 Franklin D. Roosevelt East Portico, U.S. Capitol Charles E. Hughes, Chief Justice
January 20, 1937 Franklin D. Roosevelt East Portico, U.S. Capitol Charles E. Hughes, Chief Justice
January 20, 1941 Franklin D. Roosevelt East Portico, U.S. Capitol Charles E. Hughes, Chief Justice
January 20, 1945 Franklin D. Roosevelt South Portico, White House Harlan F. Stone, Chief Justice
April 12, 1945 Harry S. Truman Cabinet Room, White House Harlan F. Stone, Chief Justice
January 20, 1949 Harry S. Truman East Portico, U.S. Capitol Frederick Vinson, Chief Justice
January 20, 1953 Dwight D. Eisenhower East Portico, U.S. Capitol Frederick Vinson, Chief Justice
January 20, 1957 Dwight D. Eisenhower Privately in East Room, White House Earl Warren, Chief Justice
January 21, 1957 Dwight D. Eisenhower Publicly on East Portico, U.S. Capitol Earl Warren, Chief Justice
January 20, 1961 John F. Kennedy East Portico, U.S. Capitol Earl Warren, Chief Justice
November 22, 1963 Lyndon B. Johnson Conference room aboard Air Force One at Love Field, Dallas, Texas Sarah T. Hughes, U.S. District Judge, Northern District of Texas
January 20, 1965 Lyndon B. Johnson East Portico, U.S. Capitol Earl Warren, Chief Justice
January 20, 1969 Richard M. Nixon East Portico, U.S. Capitol Earl Warren, Chief Justice
January 20, 1973 Richard M. Nixon East Portico, U.S. Capitol Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
August 9, 1974 Gerald R. Ford East Room, White House Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
January 20, 1977 James E. Carter East Portico, U.S. Capitol Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
January 20, 1981 Ronald W. Reagan West Front, U.S. Capitol Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
January 20, 1985 Ronald W. Reagan Privately in North Entrance Hall, White House Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
January 21, 1985 Ronald W. Reagan Publicly in Rotunda, U.S. Capitol Warren E. Burger, Chief Justice
January 20, 1989 George H. W. Bush West Front, U.S. Capitol William Rehnquist, Chief Justice
January 20, 1993 William J. Clinton West Front, U.S. Capitol William Rehnquist, Chief Justice
January 20, 1997 William J. Clinton West Front, U.S. Capitol William Rehnquist, Chief Justice
January 20, 2001 George W. Bush West Front, U.S. Capitol William Rehnquist, Chief Justice




The swearing-in traditionally takes place at noon on Inauguration Day at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., with the Chief Justice of the United States administering the oath. From the presidency of Martin Van Buren through Jimmy Carter, the ceremony took place on the Capitol's East Portico. Since the 1981 inauguration of Ronald Reagan, the ceremony has been held at the Capitol's West Front. The inauguration of William Howard Taft in 1909 and Reagan in 1985 were moved indoors at the Capitol due to cold weather. Until 1937, Inauguration Day was March 4. Since then, Inauguration Day has occurred on January 20 (the 1933 ratification of the Twentieth Amendment changed the start date of the term).

AOL News:

Obama Rides Rails to Capital Amid Cheers

By JENNIFER LOVEN and NANCY BENAC
AP
posted: 1 HOUR 5 MINUTES AGO

ABOARD THE INAUGURAL EXPRESS (Jan. 17) - Tracking Abraham Lincoln's historic path to Washington, President-elect Barack Obama launched a four-day inaugural celebration Saturday before thousands of chilled but cheering onlookers from Philadelphia to the nation's capital. He promised to bring the country "a new Declaration of Independence" — free from small thinking, prejudice and bigotry.

Obama invoked a grand heritage of American giants as he appealed "not to our easy instincts but to our better angels," an echo of Lincoln's first inaugural address. He took note of the enormous challenges that lie ahead and promised to act with "fierce urgency," a phrase often used by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.


Happy Birthday Martin Luther King, Jr.




It has become a reality, Martin!

theteach

12 comments:

Jamie said...

What a marvelous bit of historical info. Whether I voted for the person becoming President or not, I've always appreciated that transition that we take for granted that so many other nations have never known.

Felisol said...

Dear teach Mary,
I congratulate you, the many engaged grass root workers. Wish you all the best for this new chapter of the US of A.
from Felisol

Tink *~*~* said...

Great info, Mary - thanks!

I've written about a different kind of office -

New at My Mobile Adventures *~*~* - A tour of my home office

Tink *~*~*

Gattina said...

That will be a historical day !
A very interesting post for me, because in Belgium we only learn about the kings, presidents are countless, it changes all the time ! it's a funny little country, but nice to live in !

The Daily Photo said...

What a news over Obama...

My entry this week : in HERE. I hope you have time to visit. Thanks

Alice said...

Very nice post,interesting info. Mine is also about Obama as I'm sure many will be. The difference is 1- I'm Canadian, not American 2- I did my post before I knew the Manic Monday word.

Julie said...

Wow! You did a lot of research for this post. You go Teach! I hope you get a minute to see my take on "Office".

Bond said...

Today we honor a hero...tomorrow we honor a man of dignity and class...


Hear and win new music on Monday's on The Couch

storyteller said...

Wonderful choice for this week's topic! I enjoyed the photos and the history lesson.
Hugs and blessings,

Pagan Sphinx said...

What a refreshing change our new first family is going to be. It'll be nice to have children in the white house. As much as I find those two Obama girls too adorable, I do hope they have a good experience while their dad is running our country.

I posted my first Manic Monday post. It was fun!

My Autism Insights said...

Cool post! I am so excited about tomorrow!

My post has to do with a different kind of office.

Travis said...

It was a fantastic day and I'm glad we got to see it live from my office.