Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Obama speaks for ALL Americans


Barack Obama took on the issue of racial divide today and spoke for African-Americans and for all Americans in a quiet, intelligent, strong manner. In the Atlantic.com Ross Douthat asked the question, "Can you think of a better speech on race in America delivered recently by any politician, black or white?"

The transcript of the speech is here and it behooves EVERY American to read it. The speech bravely and openly confronts race in our country unlike anything since Martin Luther King Jr.

Obama said
This was one of the tasks we set forth at the beginning of this campaign – to continue the long march of those who came before us, a march for a more just, more equal, more free, more caring and more prosperous America. I chose to run for the presidency at this moment in history because I believe deeply that we cannot solve the challenges of our time unless we solve them together – unless we perfect our union by understanding that we may have different stories, but we hold common hopes; that we may not look the same and we may not have come from the same place, but we all want to move in the same direction – towards a better future for of children and our grandchildren.
and he said
Throughout the first year of this campaign, against all predictions to the contrary, we saw how hungry the American people were for this message of unity. Despite the temptation to view my candidacy through a purely racial lens, we won commanding victories in states with some of the whitest populations in the country. In South Carolina, where the Confederate Flag still flies, we built a powerful coalition of African Americans and white Americans.
and he said
And yet, it has only been in the last couple of weeks that the discussion of race in this campaign has taken a particularly divisive turn.

On one end of the spectrum, we’ve heard the implication that my candidacy is somehow an exercise in affirmative action; that it’s based solely on the desire of wide-eyed liberals to purchase racial reconciliation on the cheap. On the other end, we’ve heard my former pastor, Reverend Jeremiah Wright, use incendiary language to express views that have the potential not only to widen the racial divide, but views that denigrate both the greatness and the goodness of our nation; that rightly offend white and black alike.
and he said
Like other predominantly black churches across the country, Trinity embodies the black community in its entirety – the doctor and the welfare mom, the model student and the former gang-banger. Like other black churches, Trinity’s services are full of raucous laughter and sometimes bawdy humor. They are full of dancing, clapping, screaming and shouting that may seem jarring to the untrained ear. The church contains in full the kindness and cruelty, the fierce intelligence and the shocking ignorance, the struggles and successes, the love and yes, the bitterness and bias that make up the black experience in America.
There is so much more, so much more that is important and thoughtful that you would do yourself a favor to read the speech yourself. You can listen to the speech here.

theteach

2 comments:

Travis said...

I read the recap of the speech, but not the speech itself yet. I'm glad he addressed the issue.

I'm a soon-to-be 44 year old white moderate Democrat. I'm ready to vote for the candidate with whom I agree most, whether that candidate is a woman or a black man.

This election has never been about gender or race for me. It has never been about mean-spirited tactics or either candidate's spouse. It's not about religion.

It is merely about the candidate with whom I most closely identify. That's enough for me.

Hootin' Anni said...

I have this on my campaign blog that I started after I was privileged to be up on his primary campaign speech here in town!! I grabbed the whole speech. I must admit that many of his words brought me to tears...it was eloquent and very 'real'.

And thanks for visiting my wordless wednesday...your W W is something that we all need to look at, when we begin to complain about 'prices of this and that'....when so many, so many...live with little means and don't complain.